R A D I O    R O C K S

RADIO ROCKS 2003 PDF Catalogue

(download: click each page that has a hand for sound)

Dove Bradshaw’s latest time-sculpture, Radio Rocks with its randomly received live sound, heralds a new element of Indeterminacy in her work. For the first exhibition three cone-shaped sculptures were each composed of different stone-Wissahickon schist, Pocono sandstone and a basalt mixture. Their shapes were chosen to evoke ancient cairns used as Neolithic astronomical markers and functioned also as multi-directional antennas. Within each sculpture there were three radios each designed to receive frequencies from a different zone–local, world band short wave, and outer space. Galena, fluorite, pyrite, and tourmaline acted as non-linear mixers and were computer programmed to attract random local and world-band frequencies. Hematite acted as a mixer continuously channeling Weather Radio. Live radio emissions from Jupiter were transmitted on a dedicated line from a radio telescope at Lanihuli Radio Observatory in Kaneohe, Hawaii. Random radio storms including S-Bursts–bursts of less than a hundredth of a second occurring during storms lasting for two or three hours–and Bow Shocks–the sound of solar windflow hitting Jupiter's magnetic field were captured live. Each sculpture incorporated a third receiver, using technology developed by the satellite industry, which continuously picked up microwave sounds identified as echoes of the Big Bang. Levels were set at a murmur–the outer space sounds invoked celestial harmonies that from the quieter time of Pythagoras have been referred to as the “Music of the Spheres.”

 

 

Radio Rock, 1998
Pyrite embedded in igneous rock; pyrite mixer, gold tipped cat whisker, radio computer programmed to pick up radio signals.

 

Radio Rock, 1998, inverted

 

 

Close-up showing pyrite crystal as mixer receiving radio signals

 

Radio Rock, 1998/2003
Permanent installation commissioned by
Baronessa Lucretzia Durini, Bolognano, Italy

 

Close-up: Top, World band short wave signal, Left, local radio
and Right micro-wave signals from outer space.
 

First drawing of Radio Rocks, 1998
 

Radio RocksPoster, Larry Becker Contemporary Art, Philadelphi, 2008
Radio Rocks II: Jovian Radio Telescope Reception, Local, and World Band Short-Wave on Basalt mixture cairn. Galena in copper sphere is computer programmed to pick up World Band Short-Wave frequencies; The pyrite mixer in copper triangle is computer programmed to pick up random local frequencies; Live radio emissions from Jupiter are transmitted via computer on a  dedicated line from a radio telescope at Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute, in Rosman, N Carolina and Kanihuli Radio Observatory, Haneohe, Hawii.                                          


 

Radio Rocks I: Local, World Band Short-Wave, and Microwave Signals on Pocono  sandstone cairn, 1998/2008  
Pyrite mixer in copper tetrahedron is computer programmed to pick up live random World Band Short-Wave frequencies; Fluorite mixer in copper spiral is programmed to pick up live random local frequencies; Microwave signal converter amplifies echoes of the Big Bang.

 

Radio RocksI, II, III, 1998/2008
Larry Becker Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, 2008

 

Radio Rocks III: Weather Radio, World Band Short-Wave, and Microwave Sounds
on Wissahickon schist cairn, 1998/2008
Black tourmaline mixer in copper cube is computer programmed to continuously pick up a dedicated Weather Radio frequency; Pyrite in copper triangle hooked up to the interior of the radio (with LED lights) is programmed to receive random World Band Short-Wave frequencies; Microwave signal converter amplifies echoes of the Big Bang

 

Tesla Radio Rock, 2014, Pyrite, crystals, conglomerate rock with pyrite, gold tipped cat-whisker, microcomputer and electronics for the transmitter, theremin, radio,Teslacoils, MP3 player, capacitor, speakers

Commissioned by Colorado College, Colorado Springs to commemorate one of Tesla’s 1899 Colorado Springs experiments